10 Rules for Addressing Panhandlers

quotes-10-Rules-for-Address

Dr. Pete Gathje, Memphis Theological Seminary 

“If a panhandler asks me for money, what should I do?”

This question is asked almost every time I give a talk about homelessness, or when people find out I help run Manna House, a place of hospitality for people on the streets. Here is my advice based upon my knowledge of homelessness, and talking with panhandlers.

1. Give or don’t give. It is really your choice. But always look the person in the eye who is asking, and say “Hi.” If you are not going to give then add, “Sorry I can’t help today.” If you are going to give add, “Hope this helps.” Either way, always treat the person with respect. They are human beings, made in the image of God.

2. If you do give to a panhandler, remember it is a gift, and the person is free to do with it whatever he or she wants to do. The person is not homeless because of some personal moral failure, so do not get into making moral evaluations and judgments.

3. If you do not give that is OK. Panhandlers know most people will not give. One said to me, “It is like cold calling in sales. I expect to get turned down most of the time, and it doesn’t bother me. Just treat me with respect.” (See Rule #1 above).

4. If you feel unsafe or the person panhandling is being aggressive or threatening, leave the area and don’t give. As one panhandler said to me, “There are jerks in every line of life. Don’t reward them.”

5. Sometimes give more than you are being asked for. So, if someone asks for a dollar, give them five! Both you and the panhandler can share in the joy of that unexpected gift.

6. Set a limit or a boundary to your giving. Mine is $5 per day. Once I have given out my $5 then I respond to anyone who asks, “I’ve given out already what I give each day.” I consider this my “street tax.”

7. There are people who panhandler who are not homeless. They are simply poor. It is near impossible to tell the difference between a homeless panhandler and one who is not. So, again, give if you want, or do not give if you do not want to, but treat everyone with respect. (See Rule #1 above).

8. Feeling awkward or uncomfortable when you see a panhandler or are asked for money is OK. It means you have a conscience and some compassion.

9. If you have time, and are so inclined, volunteer with an organization that works with people on the streets offering food, or shelter, or medical care etc. You will get to know some really interesting people, and they will get to know you. And you might see them on the streets from time to time, and you can wave and yell “Hi!”

10. If you really want to help people who are homeless, then advocate for housing for all homeless people and free shelters. Support organizations in your area that practice a “housing first” approach to homelessness. Also resist all efforts to dehumanize, disrespect, and criminalize people who are on the streets with laws like “No panhandling” or myths like “Panhandlers make a lot of money panhandling.” (See Rule #1 above).

(This article originally appeared in the Memphis Commercial Appeal, 9/7/18)

7 thoughts on “10 Rules for Addressing Panhandlers”

  1. I worked for an organization that has been in the housing of homeless for many years. We transitioned in to the Housing First model. It is a failure. It could be and was a great model when it was developed. The problem is, it costs a considerable amount of money if ran properly. Most jurisdictions will not fund it correctly. Housing first requires case maanagers to interact with their clients regularly sometimes daily. Most case managers are so overloaded they do not have time to make contact with their clients on a regular basis. I know of several housing first participants who are my my if they hear from their case manager once a month.

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  2. I know we should give with an open heart and not think about how the money will be used, but we have a Tim Horton’s on almost every block in our city, so I have taken to carrying $5 gifr cards, so I am confident the gift will help fill a hole in the stomach.

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  3. I was homeless for a short time a couple of years ago and I got to know a lot of the people who were homeless people a lot longer than I was n they are real people just like you n I r like it says in the Bible judge not lest ye be judged cause u never know when n where you could very well be in the exact same situation some day that is the best thing I can give you about being a homeless person u just never know

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